Fastpacking with Ben Luedke

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benluedkeRunner and fastpacker Ben Luedke has spent most of his adult life exploring the mountains on foot. Ben is an avid blogger on all things trail running (Running the Cascades) and founder of the Seattle Mountain Running Group. For 2014 he decided to find and test some of the best fastpacking gear on the market and wrote up this review for Trail Runner: 5 Fastpacking Essentials, Reviewed for Trail Runner.

We caught up with Ben to find out more about his fastpacking progression and how likes the Flight 30 for his runs. His typical fastpack involves 2-4 days in the backcountry with a base weight of 10-12 pounds (excluding water).

A backpacker since college and a trail runner for the last 7 years, Ben, like many, found the combination of running and backpacking to be a game changer. “When I first heard about fastpacking, I knew I'd stumbled into something special. By combining backpacking and long-distance trail running, I could see more of the backcountry than I otherwise would, while moving quickly and getting a good workout,” he said.

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10 Questions with Timothy Summerfield

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timothydeschutes3This week we catch up with cyclist and kayaker Timothy Summerfield for our 10 Questions post. Ultralight gear isn’t just for the backpackers out there, Timothy uses a variety of Six Moon Designs gear on the water and on his bike.

1) How did you get started backpacking?
I am not a backpacker. I am a touring cyclist and flat water kayaker. I got started just three years ago at retirement. I gave up all the sports which required a helmet and picked cycling to get me outdoors.

2) What is your favorite piece of gear?
That would be my new Haven tarp which just replaced the Deschutes tarp. I liked the Deschutes a lot but wanted a shelter with a better view like the rectangular tarps I have had.

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Discover Long Distance Trails - Ice Age Trail & Bruce Trail

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iceageYou have completed your ultralight set-up, now it’s time to hit the trail, but unless you have had your sights set on a particular long distance trail, where to go?

We will periodically cover some of some lesser-known long distance trails in our blog. From a week to a few months, these hikes will help you scratch the backpacking itch and stretch your legs. Do you have a trail you think backpackers would want to know about? Send us an This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and we’ll spread the word.

Ice Age Trail, 1,200 miles, Wisconsin

All long distance trails have some incredible stories to tell through their history and geology, but the Ice Age Trail (IAT) has a very unique personality. It all revolves around glaciers. Yes, at one time most of Wisconsin was covered in ice, and the Ice Age Trail, at about 1,200 miles long, follows the outline of the most recent glacier the state has seen.

Go back over 12,000 years. An immense flow of glacial ice carved and scraped along the landscape, and during its retreat left glacial remnants that tell a story. A story of how glaciers change and shape the land.

Hikers along the Ice Age Trail will encounter kames, lakes, drumlins, ice-walled-lake plains, outwash plains, eskers, tunnel channels and more geologic wonders left by the retreating ice. (What are those things? Check out the IAT Glossary to find out more).

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Lemons To Lemonade Sale

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Lemons To Lemonade

Six Moon Designs Lemons for Lemonade Sale is over. Thanks to all of the people who picked up the damaged Lunar Duo Outfitters, we were able to raise $10,230. Based upon your request, the money will be dispersed in the following amounts:

Appalachian Trail Conservancy $4510
Pacific Crest Trail Association $3370
Continental Divide Trail Coalition  $2350

 

We'd like to thank everyone who purchased on of our shelters. I know that the different trail orginizations are grateful for your support. We hope you'll enjoy your new tent for years to come.

Thanks from the Staff at Six Moon Designs

Last Updated on Wednesday, 31 December 2014 09:35

 

Wilderness

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The recent passage of a package of public land bills in Congress amounted to 246,300 acres of new Wilderness areas in the United States. Since the Wilderness Act became law 50 years ago in 1964, the U.S. now has over 760 Wilderness areas covering almost 110 million acres from the tip of Alaska to the far reaches of Florida. The recent bill is the largest in five years, and adds protected land in Washington, Nevada, Colorado, Montana, and New Mexico.

So where are these new Wilderness areas and what is now protected?
(As reported by the Conservation Alliance)

  • Alpine Lakes Additions, Washington: Legislation protects 22,000 acres of additions to the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, and 40 miles of the Pratt and Middle Fork Snoqualmie Rivers as Wild and Scenic.
  • Hermosa Creek, Colorado: The bill protects the 108,000-acre Hermosa Creek Watershed in the San Juan National Forest of southwestern Colorado, including nearly 38,000 acres of new Wilderness within the watershed.
  • Rocky Mountain Front, Montana: The bill adds 50,500 acres to the Bob Marshall Wilderness and 16,700 acres to the Scapegoat Wilderness. The legislation also designates 208,000 acres as Conservation Management Areas.
  • Columbine-Hondo, New Mexico: The bill protects 45,000 acres north of Taos, in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, including Gold Hill, its highest peak. The new Wilderness also contains the headwaters for two rivers.
  • Wovoka, Nevada: The bill designates 48,000 acres of wilderness in Lyon County. The Wovoka Wilderness will be named in honor of the Native American spiritual leader and father of the Ghost Dance, who lived near the area.
  • Pine Forest Range, Nevada: The bill protects the 26,000 acre Pine Forest Range Wilderness in northwest Nevada.

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